• 03 AUG 14

    There were a couple of items that stuck in the memory through the recent conference leave that highlight the two extremes of our favourite (by annual figures at any rate) cosmetic option.

    On one hand, the woman who some might say should ‘get out more’, receives the novel new treatment of “eartox” (read the full article here on the Daily Mail website). In fact, it is nothing to do with ‘Botox®’ and the ears, but the term has now become synonymous with any cosmetic intervention. In much the same fashion as Hoover has become the descriptive noun for any device that employs vacuum suction to clean carpets. In fact, it has nothing to do with the muscle-relaxing neuromodulator, but simply refers to plumping up of wrinkled earlobes with dermal filler. For more information about Dermal fillers click here

    It is a little known fact that ears are one of the few parts of the body that gradually increases in size with age, but looking closely at the subject’s lobes, she has both a degree of creasing and elongation of the piercing hole. This happens in many who favour heavy earrings and is a common procedure for us surgeons to repair under a brief local anaesthetic. The simplest method freshens the edges and closes the split, usually with absorbable sutures. Re-piercing can occur a few months later, usually in a slightly different spot, however, there is a slightly more complicated, but infinitely more elegant option. The surgeon can use some of the otherwise removed skin as a rolling flap and preserve piercing. Do you need help with split earlobe reconstruction?

    We have also used Botox® in order to cure people suffering from hyperhidrosis; a medical condition where the patient suffers from sever chronic sweating. Read more about curing hyperhidrosis using Botox here 

    At the other end of the spectrum, the BBC’s report of the potential, albeit probably way in the future, role for Botox® in cancer treatment (full article on the BBC website here). A study on mice found that botulinum toxin affected nerves that could slow the growth of stomach tumours and enhance the effect of chemotherapy. The list of ®Botox’s proven health benefits is already lengthy and this particular effect, if true, would certainly be of immense health benefit.

    Article by our cosmetic surgeon Mr Miles Berry MS, FRCS (Plast)

    Finally if you would like to find out more about Botox® treatment please check our dedicated Botox® treatment page. As  always if you would like to arrange a Botox® session at our London Clinic or have a no obligation consultation click the link below or call today on 0207 486 6778.

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    The video below featuring surgeon Mr Nick Percival FRCS explains more about the Botox® procedure

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